Reviewing OmegaT: A Free and Open-Source Offline Translation Tool

During the course of my OPW internship last year, I had reviewed some online translation tools which are very popular with the FOSS community. This time around, I am reviewing OmegaT, which not many in the FOSS community are aquainted with, but which is loved and admired by translators worldwide.

OmegaT: The Basics

1. CAT tool: OmegaT is a CAT or Computer-Aided Translation tool. CAT tools make life easy for translators by bringing handy tools like fuzzy matches, glossary, dictionary, translation memory, and spell checker, among other things, all under one roof.

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Commotion Wireless Localization: Status update 14 September 2013

The countdown to the end of the 2013 summer-round of GNOME OPW has begun. Before my internship draws to a close, I wish to update my work status. In my last post, I had shared my to-do list. Here’s a recapitulation of those tasks along with where things stand as of today.

Task to do

Status

Create an outreach document to solicit translators.

Done

Create a guide for new translators.

Done. See https://commotionwireless.net/fr/node/9092

Collaborate with Megan to create a glossary.

No development on this front.

Subtitle and then translate the following Commotion video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HenfJLqQtNs

 Subtitling done; translation on hold.

 Start translating.

Finished translating Commotion Documentation and Commotion User Interface files into French, along with some other translators. Now reviewing the translated strings for correctness and homogeneity.

In the last leg of the internship, I foresee myself completing the review, translating the above-mentioned video into French, and creating a list of all the highly technical terms used in the Commotion documentation along with their equivalents in French. This last task could serve as a starting point for a multi-lingual dictionary of terms used by the developers of Commotion, and would, I hope, be of help to other translators in the future.

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Localizing Commotion Wireless Project: Next Steps

Moving from planning to implementation is just so exciting. After one and half months of researching and reporting on how to localize Commotion, my colleagues at OTI and I have now started working on putting the localization plan into action. Soon I will also start translating. On 2 August 2013, incidentally coinciding with the midpoint of my GNOME OPW internship, I had a “brown bag” hangout with Preston, Ryan, Chris, Seamus, Andrew, Andy, and Darby (all from OTI), and my OPW co-interns Hasna and Megan. [Though it was supposed to be a “brown bag”, the only person eating was Preston, and out of a plastic box!]

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Circumvention Tech Summit

Circumvention Tech Summit (CTS) is a biannual event organized by OpenITP (part of the Open Technology Institute). CTS has been held thrice before, in Rio de Janeiro, Tunis and Hong Kong. CTS IV is scheduled to take place in Berlin, Germany from 29 September to 1 October 2013.

circumvention-tech-summit-IVImage source: http://www.openitp.org

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International Summit for Community Wireless Networks 2013

The Open Technology Institute (OTI) is hosting the 7th International Summit for Community Wireless Networks, acronymed as IS4CWN. The event will be held in Berlin, Germany from 2-4 October 2013.  

IS4CWN aims to facilitate exchange of ideas and encourage collaboration among technologists, researchers and policy analysts working in the field of community wireless networks. The first ever instance of IS4CWN took place in 2004. The Commotion Wireless Project (OTI’s flagship project, which is also what I am working on as part of GNOME OPW internship) was born out of the 2010 summit held in Vienna, Austria.

international-summit-for-community-wireless-networks-logo(CC BY-SA 3.0)

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Software Freedom Day (SFD) 2013

The open-source community is always abuzz with activity. If you miss out on one event, there is always another one happening someplace close to you. As I write this post, I know there are at least four major events about to take place in the next three months. There is GUADEC, which begins in three days from now (too late for me to write about this year’s edition). Then, there is Circumvention Tech Summit and International Summit for Community Wireless Networks to be held in September and October, respectively (read my posts on these two events here and here). Finally, there is Software Freedom Day, which is slated for the 21st of September 2013.  

What is Software Freedom Day (SFD)?

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Translation Management Tools – Transifex, Pootle and Launchpad: A Comparison of Features

Localization (L10n) is a big priority with open-source projects. It is all about reaching out to the widest audience possible by making their software speak the language the end-user is most comfortable with. Almost every project, big or small, has its own L10n efforts, with hundreds of community-members pitching in, driven by their desire to give back. The more a software is popular, the greater the number of language teams it has. It is not rare to find translations happening in a variety of minority languages from different corners of the world. That’s the beauty of open-source projects!  

Coordinating hundreds of contributors and managing the huge quantum of work happening all the time can be a tall order. Enter L10n/translation management tools and what looks like a mammoth task at first becomes a breeze in a flash. There are several of these tools available and new ones keep coming on to the scene every now and again. In my post titledLocalizing Commotion Wireless Project: First Steps, I had mentioned the 12 open-source projects I had explored to understand their L10n processes and to know the tools they use. From the insights gained from that research, I took up 3 tools for investigation, namely Transifex, Pootle and Launchpad. I studied 2 more tools – Weblate and TranslateWiki.net. Weblate is the newest of all the tools and is heavily inspired by Pootle. TranslateWiki.net, though good in some ways, does not have some of the advantageous features the other tools offer. So, I am going to confine this post to what I found regarding Transifex, Pootle and Launchpad.

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Video Subtitling, Captioning and Translation Tools: Amara versus Dotsub

In my last post, I described which open-source projects and communities I had studied for a comparative analysis of the L10n tools and processes used by them. Carrying on from where I left, I am going to be talking about the various tools I have since researched. I was told that a lot of Commotion’s documentation is going to be in the form of videos. So, I started my expedition with tools that are specifically designed to aid in translating video content. One of the earliest projects I had looked into for L10n ideas was the WITNESS project, from whose blog post titled An Open Source Approach to Translation I had come to learn about Amara and Dotsub. This post is dedicated to my findings on these two tools.  

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Localizing Commotion Wireless Project: First Steps

Commotion is a free and open-source communication tool that uses mobile phones, computers, and other wireless devices to create decentralized mesh networks.” The project development began in 2011 and the preliminary deployment happened in 2012 in Detroit. On 20 March 2013, the Beta version of Commotion (Developer Release #1, DR1) was released, making Commotion available to the public for testing and feedback.

Commotion is so far available only in English. In order to take it to the masses in the different corners of the world, it (software, user guides, training manuals) needs to be localized and translated. During my first meeting with my mentors, I was made aware that my role as a GNOME OPW intern would be to help develop a plan for internationalization (i18n) and localization (L10n) of all of the Commotion Wireless Project’s documentation, and that my first task would be to see and compare the procedures and processes other FOSS projects employ to execute their own L10n projects.

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My GNOME OPW internship takes off!

The eagerly awaited 17th of June came and went. My GNOME OPW internship took off. I am now into the 7th day of it and blog updates are in order. Here’s the first of a handful of installments.

Day 1

Day 1 was a funny (in hindsight) concoction of anticipation and apprehension, more apprehension than anticipation.

My mentors at OTI, one of my co-interns and I were supposed to have a Google Hangout to become familiar with one another and talk business. While some of us had already been interacting on IRC and over email on a one-to-one basis, it was going to be the first meeting of the OTI-OPW team as a whole. Naturally, we were all excited. Add to that the charm of a video chat and you can gauge just how much we were looking forward to the rendezvous.

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What is GNOME Outreach Program for Women?

GNOME Outreach Program for Women, OPW in short, is an internship program organized by the GNOME Foundation to encourage women to become active members of the fast-growing Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) movement and community. The program is held  biannually.

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Starting my journey as a GNOME OPW Summer Intern 2013

With just a week left for the June-September 2013 round of the GNOME Outreach Program for Women (OPW) to begin, I thought it was about time I inaugurated my blog. Like all the accepted interns (37, from around the world), I am required to record my progress and share my experiences by way of blogging. Now, I am not complaining about this requirement at all. In fact, I am really happy about it. I had been thinking of setting up a blog of my own since I don’t even remember when, but always managed to find excuses to put the idea off to tomorrow, which, as we know, never comes! All I needed was a nudge and it came in the form of OPW. Who knew?

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